Category Archives: Comic Reviews

Weekly Wanderlust – April 5, 2013

Weekly Wanderlust typically features reviews of comics released in the current week, but this one is a selection of comics from recent past weeks.

comeback5Comeback #5 (of 5)
Image Comics
(w) Ed Brisson
(a) Michael Walsh

Ed Brisson’s time-travelling miniseries comes to a close. The best thing I can say about Comeback is that it is not a mind-f… that collapses under the weight of its own ambitions.

Brisson’s time-travel plot is tight. Few characters. A narrow window of time. Simplistic, really, if you boil it down to the essentials, which are this: Time travel is illegal. A Federal agent is trying to shut down an organization using it to profit from people that would pay a lot of money to reclaim the lives of recently departed loved ones. And, wisely, Brisson presents us with a few simple, logical rules of how time travel works in his world.

Continue reading Weekly Wanderlust – April 5, 2013

Weekly Wanderlust – Shipped January 9, 2013

I celebrated my first year as a comic shop owner and the anniversary has gotten me nostalgic. I think back to when I was just a customer at ComicReaders on Grant Road and that leads me to fond memories of writing for ComicReaders.com. I interviewed comic creators and wrote reviews, blurbs of which would sometimes eventually adorn back or even front covers. I still have a print out of the email Roman Dirge sent me after he found my review of Lenore online, and, to this day, if you look at a collection of Elephantmen you will find a snippet of a review I wrote.

In honour of those good times, I shake the dust off Weekly Wanderlust—a weekly column in which ComicReaders.com regulars like Hnetka, Tillusz, Boudreau, Cameron, Hintze, Brennan, and others told comic readers what they thought about the current week’s releases. Continue reading Weekly Wanderlust – Shipped January 9, 2013

Murder Book / Back to Brooklyn

I developed an interest in crime comics leading up to the creation and release of Acts of Violence: An Anthology of Crime Comics in which my comic “The Three Princes” appears. I researched the genre– from its heyday in the 40s and early 50s, to its decline (and the parallel decline of horror comics) in the late 50s, and eventual resurgence in the late 80s and early 90s– and located and read many of the genre’s shining examples, both past and present, including “Murder, Morphine and Me”, Miss: Better Living Through Crime, and Criminal. My interest in the genre continues post-Acts of Violence and I want to tell you about two additional shining examples of the genre—one a self-published endeavor from an emerging Canadian talent, and the other a book I did not know about until one of its creators told me to check it out. Continue reading Murder Book / Back to Brooklyn

Super Hero Squad: Infinity Sword Quest

Super Hero SquadSuper Hero Squad: Infinity Sword Quest
Marvel Comics
(w) Various
(a) Various
FC, 176 pgs, $16.99 USD

I believe many of the superhero comics published by Marvel and DC are inappropriate for young children. Violence, mature storylines, complex plots, and the occasional sexually suggestive moment make mainstream superhero comics more suitable for teens and adults. Marketing to those demographics is certainly important, but a lot of publishers have also turned their attention to a younger generation in an effort to attract new readers and develop them into long-term readers of comics. One of the ways to do this is to make available quality, age appropriate comics to the younger readers and- equally important- to their parents. While there are many excellent, highly recommended comics and graphic novels for this young demographic, very few of these are within the superhero genre. Continue reading Super Hero Squad: Infinity Sword Quest

Carbon Grey #1

Carbon Grey #1
Image Comics
(w) Hoang Nguygen, Khari Evans, Paul Gardner & Mike Kennedy
(a) Hoang Nguygen, Khari Evans & Kinsun Loh
FC 32 pgs w/ ads, $2.99 US

A couple of years ago Image had a series called Dust. It was an alternate world where WWII was mixed with giant robots and mad scientists. It wasn’t bad but at just two issues it was short and not a lot happened. A sequel came out last year called Dust Wars. It wasn’t as good as the first series and something seemed to be lacking.

Carbon Grey has a similar tone. It’s set in an alternate reality where a Kaiser has ruled the world for 600 years. For as long as the Kaiser has ruled, the Kaiser has used the sisters Grey as bodyguards. Until now.

This first issue has intriguing start. The Kaiser is dead and it’s one of the Grey sisters who has done the deed. The art is amazing. Not all the plot is clear – several characters are introduced without a clear idea who everybody is. I’m not sure who the girl and the man impersonating a dead soldier are and what their part is in all of this but I’ll stick with the series and see where it goes, it has a lot of promise. (Shane Hnetka)